Division of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Toronto:


Division of  Orthopedic Surgery,  University of Toronto:

“Ten 2.5mm orthopedic drill bits were  randomized, with five undergoing thermal  cycling, within their sterile packaging, and  five serving as untreated controls. After 100  drilling cycles, the maximum drilling force, and maximum normalized torque, drilling  work and microscopic outer corner wear were significantly lower for the treated drill bits. Thermal cycling has the potential to decrease operating room costs and thermal necrosis associated with dull cutting tools. Application of this technology may also be relevant to surgical cutting tools such as saw  bladed, burrs, and reamers.  orthopedic news (3).pdfBACTERIA GROWTH (1).pdf

Orthopeadic  Research Society, Published Wiley Periodicals, Inc. "